Take hardwood cuttings of fruit

It’s simple and successful!

Once your fruit bushes have shed their leaves, you can set about taking hardwood cuttings of stems of the current year’s growth.  These cuttings are extremely simple and almost foolproof – they’re pretty much guaranteed to root, although it can take a while, but that means you can forget about them.  Come back to them next year, from about spring, and you’ll hopefully have some well-rooted plants. Currant, mulberry or gooseberry cuttings, for example, can be planted straight into the ground, in a little dedicated spot on your plot, or you can start them in pots to plant out.  Transplant, plant out or repot your cuttings when they’ve made good progress, have firmly rooted and grown good foliage later into next year. If you’ve planted our cuttings in the ground, check on them during frosty periods, when they may have loosened from their spots – just firm them back in to make sure they can withstand the weather.  And do keep an eye on potted cuttings, too.  They’ll need lightly moist soil.  Give it a go and you’ll be impressed at how well you do.

Once your fruit bushes have shed their leaves, you can set about taking hardwood cuttings of stems of the current year’s growth.  These cuttings are extremely simple and almost foolproof – they’re pretty much guaranteed to root, although it can take a while, but that means you can forget about them.  Come back to them next year, from about spring, and you’ll hopefully have some well-rooted plants.

Currant, mulberry or gooseberry cuttings, for example, can be planted straight into the ground, in a little dedicated spot on your plot, or you can start them in pots to plant out.  Transplant, plant out or repot your cuttings when they’ve made good progress, have firmly rooted and grown good foliage later into next year.

If you’ve planted our cuttings in the ground, check on them during frosty periods, when they may have loosened from their spots – just firm them back in to make sure they can withstand the weather.  And do keep an eye on potted cuttings, too.  They’ll need lightly moist soil.  Give it a go and you’ll be impressed at how well you do.