Japanese anemones

These elegant plants will fill your garden with gorgeous late colour

Nothing eases the bright lights of summer into the softer days of autumn like the Japanese anemone, Anemone hupehensis.  Both it and its kin start flowering in August, producing flurries of durable, pink or white blossoms right through to the last gasp of many late-summer daises.  Pink flowered A. hupehensis comes from China, but has been grown and escaped from gardens in Japan for long it also appears native there, too.  The hybrid, A. hybrida first appeared in the RHS garden at Chiswick in 1848 and has spawned many new varieties.  The species is characterised by five petals, but there are semi-double varieties with more, often giving a ruffled appearance.  They’re at home in most soils, but prefer those which are neutral and moist, but well drained.  They don’t like dry soil, full sun, or constantly wet conditions in winter. They take time to establish, but when happy clumps can expand into neighbouring perennials and shrubs.  They also hate disturbance so don’t cram them into small borders.  After flowering cut back after the first frost or leave stems in winter and cut back in spring.  To propagate, either take root cuttings in autumn or lift a small, youthful portion of the clump while dormant and transfer it to its new home.

Nothing eases the bright lights of summer into the softer days of autumn like the Japanese anemone, Anemone hupehensis.  Both it and its kin start flowering in August, producing flurries of durable, pink or white blossoms right through to the last gasp of many late-summer daises.  Pink flowered A. hupehensis comes from China, but has been grown and escaped from gardens in Japan for long it also appears native there, too.  The hybrid, A. hybrida first appeared in the RHS garden at Chiswick in 1848 and has spawned many new varieties.  The species is characterised by five petals, but there are semi-double varieties with more, often giving a ruffled appearance.  They’re at home in most soils, but prefer those which are neutral and moist, but well drained.  They don’t like dry soil, full sun, or constantly wet conditions in winter.

They take time to establish, but when happy clumps can expand into neighbouring perennials and shrubs.  They also hate disturbance so don’t cram them into small borders.  After flowering cut back after the first frost or leave stems in winter and cut back in spring.  To propagate, either take root cuttings in autumn or lift a small, youthful portion of the clump while dormant and transfer it to its new home.