Plant a climbing rose

These easy-to-grow plants add colour and structure

If you’ve recently unearthed or added an extra bit of fence or trellis to the garden this summer, you may be wondering what to fill it with. So good news – you can plant potted climbing roses all year round. Bare-roots should really be left till autumn and winter. Take advantage of the teeming shelves in garden centres, choc-full of container roses of all shapes and sizes, to add height and vibrancy to your planting. Your choice may be a simple one to provide colour or eventual height, or you may want to do a little research into varieties that could work better for you in terms of disease resistance and vigour. Garden centre labels may not have this information, but a quick search for climbing roses on www.davidaustinroses.co.uk, or www.crocus.co.uk, for example, will reveal more details of prospective plant health and performance for you to consider. Roses are actually quite straightforward to grow, and good watering, mulching and weeding around them will help roses in the ground. In containers, a good helping of tomato feed every couple of weeks will boost growth. Climbing roses are pruned in late autumn or winter, with old stems trimmed back and flowering sideshoots reduced by two thirds.  Tie in stems where needed. 

If you’ve recently unearthed or added an extra bit of fence or trellis to the garden this summer, you may be wondering what to fill it with. So good news – you can plant potted climbing roses all year round. Bare-roots should really be left till autumn and winter. Take advantage of the teeming shelves in garden centres, choc-full of container roses of all shapes and sizes, to add height and vibrancy to your planting.

Your choice may be a simple one to provide colour or eventual height, or you may want to do a little research into varieties that could work better for you in terms of disease resistance and vigour.

Garden centre labels may not have this information, but a quick search for climbing roses on www.davidaustinroses.co.uk, or www.crocus.co.uk, for example, will reveal more details of prospective plant health and performance for you to consider.

Roses are actually quite straightforward to grow, and good watering, mulching and weeding around them will help roses in the ground. In containers, a good helping of tomato feed every couple of weeks will boost growth. Climbing roses are pruned in late autumn or winter, with old stems trimmed back and flowering sideshoots reduced by two thirds.  Tie in stems where needed.