Get lots more pelargoniums - for free!

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If you overwintered your pelargoniums in the greenhouse, they'll have been putting on some strong new growth by now, so it's prime time to make the most of that and create some new mini plants from it. Try your hand at this propagation technique to provide yourself with some classic summer bedding next year! It's extremely satisfying and, best of all; you don't need to part with any pennies. Softwood or greenwood cuttings, which you can take from a number of perennials and shrubs now, are easy to do and are the most likely to root of all the different types of cuttings. This is because conditions are ideal right now - warm and moist, with a bit of sunshine.  These cuttings will take up to 10 weeks to root. Once you notice roots have formed, either from some popping out the bottom of a pot, or from a gentle tug of a plant, pot them up in late summer, so they can establish on their own as single plants. If you miss the boat now, just overwinter them and pot them up singly next spring. See our step by step guide in this week's Garden News!

If you overwintered your pelargoniums in the greenhouse, they'll have been putting on some strong new growth by now, so it's prime time to make the most of that and create some new mini plants from it. Try your hand at this propagation technique to provide yourself with some classic summer bedding next year! It's extremely satisfying and, best of all; you don't need to part with any pennies.

Softwood or greenwood cuttings, which you can take from a number of perennials and shrubs now, are easy to do and are the most likely to root of all the different types of cuttings. This is because conditions are ideal right now - warm and moist, with a bit of sunshine. 

These cuttings will take up to 10 weeks to root. Once you notice roots have formed, either from some popping out the bottom of a pot, or from a gentle tug of a plant, pot them up in late summer, so they can establish on their own as single plants. If you miss the boat now, just overwinter them and pot them up singly next spring.

See our step by step guide in this week's Garden News!